Palaeoslavica
Slavic Medieval Literature, History, Language
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PALAEOSLAVICA
International Journal for the Study of Slavic Medieval Literature, History, Language and Ethnology

P.O.Box 380863
Cambridge, MA 02238-0863


ISSN - 1070-5465



Volume I/1993, 262 pp. (sold out). The first volume of Palaeoslavica contains articles on the following topics: the ethnogenesis and culture of the ancient Slavs (O. Trubachev); the East Slavic expressions чур; чур меня; (за)чураться, their origin and history in East Slavic languages and dialects (A. Strakhov); the influence of the Estonian epos about Kalev on the Russian epical tradition concerning Kolyvan (F.J. Oinas); the couvade in the Russian Old Believers manuscript (A. Strakhov). The Publications of Texts section presents the article about life and activity of Petr Postnikov, a first Russian doctor, and the publication of his Oration on Christmas (N. Zapol'skaia); the publication of the 17th-century inventory of Greek books and manuscripts (O. Strakhova), and the modern records of the superstitions and beliefs attested in Belorussia and Ukraine (A. Strakhov, L. Heretz). The Speculum section suggests new readings of birch-bark documents (NNº 19, 266, 439, 589; A Strakhov).

Volume II/1994, 357 pp. (sold out). The second issue of Palaeoslavica contains articles on the following topics: adverbs ending in -ь in East Slavic languages (P. Sigalov); the relationship between folklore and history (F.J. Oinas), the cult of St. Nicholas (A. Strakhov), and the literary polemics in the aftermath of the Time of Troubles (L. Heretz). The Publications of Texts section presents the text of the Putivl' boundary book (1628-29; L. Astakhina); a new version of the Life of St. Aleksii, Metopolitan of Kiev and All Rus' (O. Strakhova); a new version of the bylina "Starets Igrenishcha" by Kirsha Danilov (I. Morozov, I. Kyzlasova). The Speculum section suggests new reading of the Novgorodian lead plate (11th-12th cc.; A Strakhov). The Miscellanea section presents notes and remarks by, among others, O. Trubachev, M. Mur'ianov, W. Klein.

Volume III/1995, 308 pp. (sold out). The third issue of Palaeoslavica contains articles on the following topics: the history of Slavic adverbs ending in -o/-ĕ (P. Sigalov); the literary activity of Monk Evfimii Chudovskii (O. Strakhova); the proper names of Russian nuns (K. Müller). The Speculum section presents an article on Slavic mythology in the light of linguistics (O. Trubachev), suggests new readings of birch-bark documents (NNº 21, 39, 131, 549 etc.) and a new hypothesis concerning the origin of the mixing of ъ/o, ь/e/ĕ in Old Russian orthography (A. Strakhov). The third issue also presents some samples of the corpus of ancient Slavic inscriptions of Kiev (V. Orel), of Old Russian epigraphics, and of Ukrainian and North-Russian folklore in present-day recordings.

Volume IV/1996, 249 pp. (sold out) contains the book by M.F. Mur'ianov entitled "Slovo o polku Igoreve v kontekste evropeiskogo srednevekov'ia" with commentaries and introduction by O.N. Trubachev and commentaries and concluding remarks by A.B. Strakhov. Book by M. Mur'ianov put the famous Igor Tale into a broad West European historical and cultural context of the mediaeval epoch.

Volume V/1997, 360 pp.  (sold out) The fifth issue of Palaeoslavica contains articles on the following topics: ancient Slavs on the Danube (O. Trubachev), Constantine-Cyril and Mesrop-Mas't‘oc‘ (N. Trunte); the 14th-15th cc. manuscripts of the Novgorod Lisitsy Monastery (M. Gal'chenko); literary activity of Prince Andrei Kurbskii (V. Kalugin); Slavic tradition of Joca Monachorum (A. and O. Strakhov); rhythmical function of pleophony and non-pleophony in Russian folk songs (J. Bailey). The Publication of Texts section contains an edition with commentaries of Maksim Grek's Greek poems (I. Ševčenko), as well as the text of some 17th-century monastic inventories (L. Astakhina). The Speculum section offers new readings of birch-bark documents (NºNº 133, 136, 325, 359, 390) by A. Strakhov. The Miscellanea section presents notes and remarks by, among others, H.G. Lunt, F.J. Oinas, A. Kulik, V. Orel, and V. Pichugina.

Volume VI/1998, 340 pp. (sold out). The sixth issue of Palaeoslavica contains articles on the following topics: the ancient Slavs on the Danube (continuaion; O. Trubachev), the history of Slavic qualitative adverbs with prefixes (P. Sigalov); the 15th-century manuscripts of the Kirillo-Belozerskii Monastery (M. Gal'chenko); the ‘reading list’ of Prince Andrei Kurbskii (A. Gorfunkel'); images of domestic animals in marriage customs in Riazan' province of Russia (E. Samodelova). The Publication of Texts section contains an edition of the first part of the Putiatina Mineia, an 11th-century manuscript, with commentaries and parallels from Greek and Slavonic sources (May 1-9; † M. Mur'ianov); publications of 17th-century Russian (L. Astakhina) and Latin (V. Kalugin) historical documents, as well as modern recordings of folkloric texts describing marriage customs in Riazan' province (E. Samodelova). The Speculum section offers new readings of inscriptions on objects described in the catalogue of the 1997 Metropolitan Museum of Art exhibit "The Glory of Byzantium" (I. Ševčenko), and lexicological observations on the contents of modern historical dictionaries (A. Strakhov; I. Dobrodomov). The Miscellanea section presents notes and remarks by, among others, I. Ševčenko, F. J. Oinas, V. Kalugin, V. Pichugina, I. Morozov, and I. Sleptsova.
Volume VII/1999, 352 pp.  (sold out) The seventh issue of Palaeoslavica contains articles on the following topics: Povest' vremennykh let and principles of its editing (D. Ostrowski); the textology and ideology of princely panegyrics in Old Russian chronicles (A. Tolochko); 15th-century manuscripts of the Kirillo-Belozerskii Monastery (continuation; M. Gal'chenko); a new Greek source for Patriarch Nikon's affair (I. Ševčenko); the knowledge of antiquity in 17th-century Muscovy (O. Strakhov); controversies over Jan Belobodskii's Confession of Faith (A. Gorfunkel'). The Publication of Texts section contains an edition of the second part of the Putiatina Mineia, May 10-18 († M. Mur'ianov); Life of Anufrii Pustynnyi in Nil Sorskii's autograph (T. Lönngren); a fund-raising speech by Epifanii Slavinetskii (O. Strakhov); archival materials on the baking of ritual breads in Riazan' province (N. Lebedeva). The Speculum section offers some new explanations of the origin of Novgorodian-Pskovian -kl-, -gl- reflexes, as well as new readings of birch-bark letters NNº 102, 156, 288, 305 (both articles by A. Strakhov); it also contains a review of "The Emergence of Rus: 700-1200" by S. Franklin and J. Shepard (D. Ostrowski).The Miscellanea section presents notes and remarks by, among others, Ju. Burmistrovich, N. Nechunaeva, I. Ševčenko, V. Orel, F.J. Oinas.

Volume VIII/2000, 358 pp.  (sold out) The eighth issue of Palaeoslavica contains articles on the following topics: legends on the coins of St. Vladimir (J. Perkowski); 14th-15th-century manuscripts of the Troitse-Sergiev Monastery († M. Gal'chenko); an obituary of M.G. Gal'chenko (A. Strakhov); peculiarities of the marriage customs in Rybinsk district of Yaroslavl' province (E. Samodelova). The Publication of Texts section contains an edition of the last part of the Putiatina Mineia, May 19-31 († M. Mur'ianov); 17th-century documents from the archive of the Onezhskii Stauros Monastery (account book of tseloval'nik Nikita Isakov) (L. Astakhina); a first part of Jan Belobotskii's Confession of Faith (A. Gorfunkel'); modern records of marriage customs in Kaluga and Orel provinces (E. Samodelova). The Speculum section presents the explanations of the origin of Novgorodian-Pskovian -kl-, -gl- reflexes (continuation), as well as new readings of birch-bark letters NN 169 and 218 (both articles by A. Strakhov), and new interpretation of some Turkisms in the Old Russian language (I. Dobrodomov); it also contains a critical analysis of a new book by V.V. Kalugin on the literary contributions of Prince Andrei Kurbskii and Ivan IV (Ch. Halperin). The Miscellanea section presents notes and remarks by, among others, Ju. Burmistrovich, I. Ševčenko, F. J. Oinas, etc.

Volume IX/2001, 306 pp.  (sold out) The ninth issue of Palaeoslavica contains articles on the following topics: the ornamental principles of a line, especially, the end of the line, in early Slavic manuscripts (A.Strakhov), the city of Ravenna and its mention in the early Kievan literature († M. Mur'ianov), an analysis of two excerpts from the Bulgarian Mineia prazdnichnaia of the archaic type (N. Nechunaeva), polemical literature in the Muscovite Rus' in the 1st half of the 17th century (T. Oparina). The Publication of Texts section contains the Church Slavonic translation of Clemens of Rome's Vita as it is preserved in the hagiographical collection attributed to Prince Andrei Kurbskii (V. Kalugin); 17-century documents from the archive of the Onezhskii Stauros Monastery (monastic inventories) (L. Astakhina); the 2nd part of Jan Belobotskii's Confession of Faith (A. Gorfunkel'); modern records of marriage customs in the Riazan' province (E. Samodelova). The Speculum section offers a new view on Cyril and Methodius' role in the creation of the literary Church Slavonic language (K. Maksimovich); some remarks concerning the readings of birch-bark letters NN 131 and 633 (A. Strakhov); the section also contains a critical analysis of V.M. Zhivov's article on Byzantine culture in Russia of early modern time (O. Strakhova). The Miscellanea section presents notes and remarks by, among others, † M.Gal'chenko, Ju. Burmistrovich, T. Popova, I. Ševčenko.

Volume X/2002, no. 1 (xxvi, 330 pp.), no. 2 (v, 340 pp.). The tenth issue of Palaeoslavica (nos. 1-2) is dedicated to the eightieth birthday of Professor Ihor Ševčenko and has a special title: ΧΡΥΣΑΙ ΠΥΛΑΙЗЛАТАЯ ВРАТА. Essays presented to Ihor Ševčenko on his eightieth birthday by his colleagues and students, eds., Peter Schreiner and Olga Strakhov. It contains articles devoted to various questions of Byzantine and Slavic history, literature, art, hagiography, epigraphy and textual criticism by 55 scholars, Byzantinists and Slavists, of Europe and USA. Ihor Ševčenko is Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Byzantine History and Literature, Emeritus, at Harvard University. A Ukrainian born in Poland, he studied at Charles University (Prague) and Université Catholique de Louvain, and was a member of Henri Grégoire’s Seminar in Byzantine History in Brussels. He has taught and conducted research at many universities and institutions, including Collège de France, Cologne, Munich, Columbia, Michigan, and Berkeley. He has also been a Visiting Fellow at All Souls and Wolfson Colleges, Oxford, and received the Research Prize of the Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung. Long associated with Dumbarton Oaks, where he served as Director of Studies, he became Professor of Byzantine History and Literature in Harvard University's Department of the Classics in 1973. He has also served as acting director of the Ukrainian Research Institute, Harvard University. Professor Ševčenko, a specialist in Byzantine cultural history, was President of the Association Internationale des Études Byzantines (1986-1996) and is a member of the American Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, the British Academy, the Société de Bollandistes, the Accademia Pontaniana, the Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, and other learned societies. He holds honorary doctorates from the Universities of Cologne and Warsaw.
Volume XI/2003, 309 pp. The eleventh issue of Palaeoslavica contains an articles by T. Vilkul on the Novgorodian First Chronicle and its relationship with the so-called Nachal'nyi Letopisnyi Svod, the existense of which was postulated by A.A. Shakhmatov; by O. Strakhov on the linguistic views of Josef Dobrovský, the great Czech scholar (1753-1829), whose name has recently been added to the "list" of possible forgers of the famous Igor' Tale. The article examines linguistic views of Dobrovský, as we infer them from his works and treatises, and compares them with the linguistic practice of the creator of the Tale. The Publication section presents a collection of scribal notes and colophons from 173 Old Russian manuscripts of the 13th-15th centuries, gathered by the late M. Gal'chenko. It also presents modern records of the Christmas carols, collected by E. Samodelova and her colleagues during the folklore expeditions to the Central Russia. The Speculum section contains an article by F.J. Thomson on the origin of the Slavonic version of the Vita of St. Apollinaris; an article by A. Strakhov concerning some mistakes and/or inappropriate readings attested in modern editions of the Old Russian texts; and an article by D. Ostrowski on the Church Council of 1503 and the disputes between Iosifliane and Nestiazhateli with particular emphasis on textological problems presented by those Old Russian documents and written sources that describe the Council. The Miscellanea section contains articles and notes by, among the others, D. Stern, I. Ševčenko, and L. Sazonova.
Volume XI contains the index of all articles published in the previous ten issues.


Vol. XII of Palaeoslavica consists of two issues (324 pp., 335 pp.). No. 1 of Palaeoslavica XII contains articles by F. Klimchuk on some obscure moments in the medieval history of the Turov and Pinsk regions of Belarus; by A. Litvina and F. Uspenskii on the history of the personal names of the Rurikid dynasty of the pre-Mongol period; by A. Strakhov on the confusion of Nominative and Vocative in Old Russian texts; by N. Antropov on the etymology of some words attested uniquely in the Belorussian language; by N. Bondar' on the semiotics of traditional fortune-tellings recorded in the Kuban' region. The Speculum section contains a discussion by T. Vilkul of the new edition of the Primary Chronicle published by D. Ostrowski; an article by O. Strakhov on the new book by E.L. Keenan that challenges the authenticity of the Igor' Tale; a response by H.M. Eckhoff to V.B. Krys'ko concerning her recently published book on the nominative phrases in the Old Russian language; and an article by A. Strakhov about some mistakes and/or inappropriate lexicographical interpretations attested in the multi-volumed Slovar' russkikh narodnyx govorov.
No. 2 of Palaeoslavica XII presents V. Badurina-Stipčević's publication of the Book of Esther after the Croatian Glagolitic Vat. Ill. 5 Breviary (14th c.); a publication of some administrative documents of the 17th century by L. Astakhina; an article about A.A. Dmitrievskii (1856-1929), an outstanding Russian liturgist, by O.B. Strakhov and the publication (with facsimile) of Dmitrievskii's unpublished article on the Patriarch Nikon's Leitourgiarion; a publication of some litigations of the 17th-18th cc. by A. P. Maiorov; the volume also presents modern records of spring songs and popular beliefs, collected in the Central Russia and Polissia. The Miscellanea section contains articles and notes by, among the others, M. Čunčić, N. Trunte, and A. Selin.
Volume XIII of Palaeoslavica for 2005 consists of two issues (341 pp., 318 pp.). No. 1 of Palaeoslavica XIII consists of two sections: Articles and Miscellanea. Section Articles presents the last part of the article by F. Klimchuk on the medieval history of some regions of Belarus; it also contains articles by T. Vilkul on the origin of the common prototext of the Laurentian and Hypatian Chronicles; by A. Tolochko on the chronology of the Galician-Volhynian Chronicle; by D. Ostrowski on the textual relationships between the Life of Josif of Volokolamsk and the Life of Serapion, Archbishop of Novgorod; by A. Selin on the political situation in Novgorod in 1610/11 and its reflection in some documents of the Gosudarev vinnyi pogreb; by O. Strakhov on the dynamics and strategy of corrections, introduced into the Apostoly of the 2nd half of the 17th c.; by A. Strakhov on the etymology of Russian dialectisms kondrashka, zhivoglot, etc.; by V. Dobrovol'skaia on the role of taboos in the active life of peasants in Northern and Central Russia; and the survey by A. Khrolenko et al. of problems and alternatives of linguistic aspects of folkloric studies. Section Miscellanea presents articles and notes by, among others, P. Ambrosiani, S. Kisterev, A. Shchavelev, I. Dobrodomov.

No. 2 of Palaeoslavica XIII consists of sections Speculum and Publications. Section Speculum presents A. Strakhov's analysis of some etymologies of Proto-Slavic cultural terms; an article by Francis Butler on the controversial issues concerning early testimonies of the cult of St. George in Kievan Rus'; a reply by D. Ostrowski to the critics of his edition of the Primary Chronicle; and another article by A. Strakhov discussing obstacles and pitfalls of "folk etymology" and its study. Section Publications presents Slovo ob otrechenii ot mira... by John Climacus according to its oldest Slavic manuscript (publ. and comm. by T. Popova), as well as some documents about the conflict between revisers and authorities at the Moscow Printing Yard in the beginning of the 18th c. (publ. and comm. by O. Strakhov). The section also contains a number of large publications of folkloric material in modern records: Russian lullabies (publ. and comm. by E. Samodelova), Ukrainian folk medicine and curative spells (publ. and comm. by A. Strakhov), rituals and songs, performed on the Nativity and Trinity days in the North-West of the Perm' region (comm. and publ. by K. Prokosheva).
Volume XIV/2006, 383 pp. The Articles section opens with E. Ukhanova's study of one of the most gorgeous early Slavic manuscripts, the Mstislavovo Evangelie, and its place in the culture of 11th-12th century Old Rus'. L.Gnatenko's article analyzes the paleography and orthography of the Kievan Lavrskoe Evangelie of the 14th century. V.Chentsova's article in-vestigates the historical context of a famous petition written by Metropolitan Theophanos of Paleopatras in 1645 urging the Tsar to open a Greek School and Greek Printing House in Moscow (the article contains a great number of illustrations as well as a publication of the petition's Greek original). M.Lobanov's article dicusses the practice of podbliudnoe (lit.: "under-the-platter") fortune-telling in Russia. The Publications section presents "Slovo ot knig sv. Isikhiia" after the 12th-13th century manuscript (publ. and comm. by O.Strakhov); a few documents of the 17th century from the Russian North (publ. and comm. by L.Astakhina) and Siberia (publ. and comm. by L.Gorodilova); a number of large publications of folkloric material from modern records: West Belorussian ballads (publ. and comm. by F.Klimchuk); descriptions of church feasts in the Komi region (by A.Paniukov and G. Savel'eva); and a description of the cult of St. Nicholas according to modern East Belorussian records (by G.Lopatin). The article by A.Strakhov in the Speculum section discusses controversial questions surrounding Old Russian and Church Slavonic orthography. The Miscellanea section contains articles and notes by A. Danylenko, M. Lobanov, etc. 
Volume XV of Palaeoslavica for 2007 consists of two issues (354 pp., 350 pp.). No. 1 of Palaeoslavica XV consists of four sections. The Articles section contains a study by O. Tolochko who proposes a new look at the relationship between the Short and the Expanded Redactions of Pravda Ruskaia; a study by V. Chentsova who investigates an engrossing tale about bringing the miracle-making icon of the Theotokos of Blachernas from Greece to Moscow in the 17th c.; and a study by A. Strakhov who analyzes several Eastern Slavic marriage rituals dealing with horse collars in terms of their cleansing functions. The Publications section presents Slovo o bezgnevii by John Climacus following to the oldest extant Slavic manuscript (publ. and comm. by T. Popova) and folklore narratives about mermaids (rusalki) recorded in Central Russia (publ. by E. Samodelova) and in Belarus’ (publ. by G. Lopatin). The Speculum section discusses the history of the word lafa and points to various mistakes in its lexicographical treatment. The Miscellanea section contains notes by P. Schreiner, C.M. Vakareliyska, et al.

No. 2 of Palaeoslavica XV also consists of four sections. The Articles section presents a study by D. Christians in which she reconstructs the Kanon Mefodiiu Patarskomu following the extant Slavic manuscripts; an article by T. Vilkul that analyzes the relationship between PVL and Old Russian Khronographs; and a study by O. Strakhov featuring a detailed discussion of titles of Russian Patriarchs from 1589 to 1700. The Publications section presents some seventeenth-century texts from Siberia, and a description of present-day calendar rituals attested in the Komi region. The Speculum section contains two reviews: the first by J. Fellerer who analyzes A. Danylenko's recent book on various questions of Ukrainian philology, and by D. Ostrowski who re-evaluates the relationship between the Galician-Volynian Chronicle and the Life of Alexander Nevskii. The Miscellanea section contains notes by F. Klimchuk and A. Strakhov.

Volume XVI of Palaeoslavica for 2008 consists of two issues (288 pp., 302 pp.). No. 1 of Palaeoslavica XVI consists of four sections. The Articles section contains a study by T. Popova and O. Strakhov on the Greek original and earliest Slavic translation of the 150 Chapters by Makarius of Egypt; an article by A. Maiorov on lexemes used in 18th-century East Siberean manuscripts to describe a person's physical appearance; A. Strakhov's article on Slavic and Ancient Greek parallels to a Russian fortune-telling ritual; and M. Bobunova's survey of dictionaries of Russian folk songs. The Publications section presents a text of Alexandria as it is preserved in the Troitskii Khronograph (beginning of the 15th century; publ. by T. Vilkul); some documents concerning the grain supply for the Russian Tsar House in the 17th century (publ. by L. Astakhina) and folk narratives about popular medicine (publ. by T. Volodina) and demonology (publ. by G. Lopatin) as recorded in modern Belаrus'. The Speculum section contains an article by A. Strakhov about some mistakes and/or inappropriate lexicographical interpretations attested in the multi-volumed Slovar' russkikh narodnykh govorov. The Miscellanea section contains notes by A. Tolochko, M. Lobanov et al.

No. 2 of Palaeoslavica XVI also consists of four sections. The Articles section presents a posthumous article by M. Gal'chenko on the language and orthography of the 13th-century Lestvitsa kept in RGADA (fund 181, no. 452), an article by V. Chentsova on certain mysterious circumstances surrounding Greek-Muscovite contacts in the 40s-60s of the 17th century; and a study by A. Strakhov on popular cults of John the Baptist and John the Theologian and the Virgin Mary. The Publications section presents Slovo o bezgnevii i krotosti by John Climacus following the oldest extant Slavic manuscript (publ. by T. Popova), some seventeenth-century texts from Siberia (publ. by L. Gorodilova) and folk narratives about birds and relevant superstitions recorded in modern Ukraine and Belarus' (publ. by A. Strakhov). The Speculum section contains two reviews: the first, by O. Strakhov who questions A.A. Gippius's opinion of linguo-textological stratification of the so-called Initial Chronicle, and by D. Ostrowski who analyzes Mari Isoaho's recent book on Alexandr Nevskii. The Miscellanea section con­tains notes by M. Semina, A Khrolenko et al.   

Volume XVII of Palaeoslavica for 2009 consists of two issues (317 pp., 305 pp.). No. 1 of Palaeoslavica XVII consists of four sections. The Articles section contains a study by A. Gartman and S. Tsyb suggesting a new look at the chronology of the first Russian-Tartar battles; an article by O. Strakhov investigates some questions of canonization and worship of Russian saints in the 16th c.; an article by E. Samodelova juxtaposes various Russian traditions of bride's laments during the marriage ceremony. The Publications section continues T. Vilkul’s publication of  “Alexandria” after the Trinity Laura copy of Chronograph from the beginning of the 15th c.; the section also contains ballads recorded in modern Ukraine and Belarus' (publ. by A. Strakhov). The Speculum section contains a review by P. Brown of Jukka Korpela's new book The World of Ladoga in light of recent discoveries in the early history of Northern Russia; new readings of some obscure passages in birch-bark letters №№ 314, 363, 502, 550, and 554 and corrections and emendations to a new edition of Patriarch Jachim of Antioch's epistle of 1594 to Tsar Feodor Ioannovich,  provided by A. Strakhov and V. Chentsova, respectively . The Miscellanea section contains notes by M. Semina and A. Strakhov.

No. 2 of Palaeoslavica XVII also consists of four sections. In the Articles section N. Ivanova analyzes datings of the First Novgorodian Chronicle; D. Ostrowski compares different versions of the events of 1252 on the basis of various Russian chronicles; T. Vilkul investigates similarities and differences of the Iudeiskii and Sofiiskii Chronographs; N. Samsonov and L. Samsonova survey characteristic features of old Russian dialects of North-East Siberia. The Publications section contains a Siberian text of 1687 (publ. by L. Gorodilova), Pollisian materials describing popular Christmas-tide and Easter rites and beliefs (publ. by A. Strakhov and G. Lopatin, respectively). The Speculum section contains A. Tolochko’s review of a recent book by A. Poppe and an answer by A. Gippius to the critical article by O. Strakhov published in the previous issue of Palaeoslavica (vol. XVI/2 for 2008). The Miscellanea section contains notes by A. Strakhov and F. Klimchuk.

Volume XVIII of Palaeoslavica for 2010 consists of two issues (303 pp., 313 pp.). No. 1 of Palaeoslavica XVIII consists of four sections. The Articles section contains a study by N. Antropov discussing origin and meaning of some names for ‘rainbow’ in Belorussian; an article by I. Barclay investigates historical toponomy of the Tver’ province; an article by A. Selin presents a list of Novgorodian personal names used in the beginning of the 17th c.; a posthumous article by I. Ševčenko (together with O. Strakhova) tells about the translation of Byzantine poet Manuel Philes (14th c.) by Evfimii Chudovskii, the 17th-century Muscovite monk; an article by S. Shestak discusses systems of calendar bans among the Don Cossacks; an article by E. Samodelova analyzes Russian regional tradition of telling the fairy tales. The Publications section presents the Vita of St. Nicholas the Studite in Nil Sorskii's autograph (publ. and comm. by T. Lønngren) and modern records mythologizing the local river in the region of Ust’-Tsil’ma (publ. and comm. by T. Kaneva). The Speculum section contains an article by the late I. Ševčenko; and new readings of some obscure passages in birch-bark letters №№ 69, 119, 349, 368, provided by A. Strakhov. The Miscellanea section contains notes by L. Samsonova and G. Lopatin

No. 2 of Palaeoslavica XVIII also consists of four sections. In the Articles section G. Parpulov presents a catalogue of the pre-1650 Cyrillic mss. in the U.S. public collections; an article by V. Chentsova contains new materials about Hieromonk Antonios of Xeropotamou; an article by A. Strakhov analyzes superstitions and beliefs concerning the Good Friday and a "regular" calendar Friday. The Publications section continues T. Vilkul’s publication of “Alexandria” after the Trinity Laura copy of the Chronograph from the beginning of the 15th c.; the section also contains the inventory of icons and church utensils in the Siberian Mangazeya of 1680 (publ. by L. Gorodilova); a publication by G. Lopatin presents the repertoire of the outstanding Belorussian folk teller V. Gretskaia. In the Speculum section O. Strakhova and T. Lønngren argue with some recent scholarly publications by A. Gippius and K. Åkerman Sarkisian, respectively. The Miscellanea section contains notes by I. Ševčenko and N. Samsonov.

Volume XIX of Palaeoslavica for 2011 consists of two issues (295 pp., 307 pp.). No. 1 of Palaeoslavica XIX consists of four sections. The Articles section contains a study by O. Strakhov about the late Professor Ihor Ševčenko's theory on the origin of Glagolitic; an article by A. Grishchenko on the origin and history of the form издраиль in Church Slavonic; an article by E. Ukhanova on some Old Slavonic manuscript fragments of the 11th-12th cc. in libraries of L'viv and Kiev; a study by V. Kuchkin of the early history of the Russian noble family Vorontsov-Vel'iaminov; an article by M. Bobunova on the language of lyric songs recorded in the Perm' province. The Publ­i­cations sec­tion continues G. Lopatin's publication of the repertoire of the outstanding Belo­russian folk teller V. Gretskaia. The Speculum section presents a review by S. Tsyb on O. Tolochko's recent book dedicated to the history of the Short Redaction of Russkaia Pravda; and A. Strakhov's critical remarks on the dictionary of the language of Old Believers from the region of Prichud'e (Lake Peipus, Estonia). The Miscellanea sec­tion con­tains notes by L. Liubimova and N. Likhanova and A. Strakhov.

No. 2 of Palaeoslavica XIX also consists of four sec­tions. The Articles section contains A. Strakhov's article dedicated to the memory of O.N. Trubachev on the origin of the word čelověkъ; a musicological study by G. Myers on the order of the Dedication of a church in Medieval Rus'; an article by V. Chentsova about some documents reflecting the story of bringing the Emperor Constantine's cross to 17th-century Muscovite Rus'; an article by I. Barclay on the historical toponymy of the Tver' province; an article by S. Pravednikov on the regional linguistic peculiarities of Russian folk fairy-tales. The Publications section concludes T. Vilkul’s publication of “Alexandria” after the Trinity Laura copy of the Chronograph from the begin­ning of the 15th c. and continues A. Strakhov's publication of Polissian folklore (folk weaving). The Speculum section contains observations by A. Strakhov on the semantics of slav. *gověti and *svętъ and by O. Strakhov on the history of the Old Russian augmented imperfect (like bęšetь/bękhutь) in light of new statistical data. The Miscel­lanea section contains notes by the late I. Ševčenko and by A. Strakhov.

Volume XX of Palaeoslavica for 2012 consists of two issues (313 pp., 316 pp.). No. 1 of Palaeoslavica XX consists of four sections. The Articles section contains a study by T. Vilkul on litera­ry sources of «Philosopher's Speech» in the Primary Chronicle; a study by V.G. Podkovyrova and T.G. Popova on the tradition of illustrating John Climacus’ Step Fifth On Painstaking and True Repentance; a study by A.V. Gartman and S.V. Tsyb that revises the chro­nology of Batu Chan's campaign in North-Eastern Rus’. The Publications section presents the Vita of Theodor the Studite in Nilus of Sora’s autograph published and commented upon by T. Lønngren and concludes G. Lopatin’s publication of the repertoire of the outstand­ing Belorussian folk teller V. Gretskaia. The Speculum section presents A.J. Grishchenko’s opinion on the origin of the 13th-century treatise Addresses to a Jew on the Incarnation of the Son of God and critical notes by A.F. Zhuravlev on one of the most recent volumes of the Slovar’ russkikh narodnykh govorov (letter R). The Miscellanea section contains notes by J.J. Penning­ton, Ia. Miltenov, and A. Strakhov.

No. 2 of Palaeoslavica XX also consists of four sections. The Articles section contains a commentary by H. Rothe on the most ancient Slavonic liturgical hymns; a study by T. Ilieva on the manuscript tradition of Theo­doret of Cyrrhus’ Commentaries on the Book of Prophet Ezekiel and concludes I. Barklay’s study on the his­torical toponymy of the Tver' province. The Publications section presents a comparative analysis of linguistic material contained in two editions (1705 and 1723) of the German-Russian phrasebook Moscowitischer Kauffmann (Московский купец) by P.E. Marperger; and a publica­tion of proverbs and sayings (881 units) collected and recorded by their bearer M.A. Durkina, a Russian peasant woman. The Speculum section contains observations by A. Strakhov on the semantics of slav. Rai (‘Paradise’) as sad (‘garden’) and I.G. Dobrodomov and L.A. Shcherbakova’s polemic against V. Zhivov’s theory on the origin of the Russian augmented imperfects such as бяшеть/бяхуть. The Miscellanea section contains notes by A.M. Ushakevich and by T.P. Lønngren.

An Alphabetical index of articles published in Pa­laeoslavica from 1993 to 2011 (vols. I-XIX) concludes the issue.

Volume XXI of Palaeoslavica for 2013 consists of two issues (307 pp., 308 pp.). No. 1 of Palaeoslavica XXI consists of four sections. The Articles section contains a study by T.P. Lønngren on the direct influence of the Codex Supraslensis on Old Russian hagiography; a study by T.G. Popova on the language and orthography of the oldest Slavic MS of John Climacus' Ladder; an article by T. Volodina on children's diseases and their terminology in Belorussian folklore. The Publications section presents L.A. Novitskas' study on MS Volokolamsk-37 as a possible source of the Old Russian treatise entitled The Great Creation Cycle (Velikii Mirotvornyi krug); continues A.B. Strakhov's publication of the Polissian folklore (folk calendar) and presents fairy-tales collected from a Russian village story-teller E.A. Sirotkina by E.A. Samodelova. The Speculum section contains a study by A.B. Strakhov on the German and Slavic cults of St. Vitus and an article by K.A. Maksimovich on the me­thodologies of Russian historical lexicographers in the 19th-20th cc. The Miscellanea section contains notes by P.A. Rolland, E.A. Blinova, A.P. Maiorov, etc.

No. 2 of Palaeoslavica XXI also consists of four sections. The Articles section contains a commentary by H. Rothe on the most ancient Slavonic liturgical hymns; a study by V.V. Kalugin of the early 18th-century forgery of the Euchologion of 1329; an article by S.A. Miliuchenkov on the terminology of various types of wooden buildings in chancery documents of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania; and an article by T.S. Kaneva on poetic formulae in the wedding folklore of the Russian North. The Publications section presents Accounting Books of the Onega Stavros Monastery (publ. and comm. by L.IU. Astakhina) and a collection of idioms recorded from Belorussian story-teller V.A. Gretskaia with her commentary on their usage and meaning (publ. and comm. by G.I. Lopatin). The Speculum section contains G.R. Parpulov's article on recent studies of Byzantine book illuminations; T.G. Popova's survey of Slavic MSS of John Climacus' Ladder; T. Ilieva's review of the recent study on Slavic medieval synaxaria by L. Taseva; and A.B. Strakhov's examination into the origin of some Russian words meaning ‘to deceive’, ‘to cheat’, ‘to fool’. The Miscellanea section contains notes by I. Barklay, S.K. Sevast'ianova and A.B. Strakhov.

Volume XXII of Palaeoslavica for 2014 consists of two issues (246 pp., 251 pp.). No. 1 of Palaeoslavica XXII consists of four sections.The Articles section contains a study by O. Strakhova on the pericope of Luke 24:43 in the Byzantine, Latin and Old Slavonic New Testament traditions; a study by L. Taseva on the use of quotations from St. Gregory of Nazianzus in writings by St. Gregory Palamas; an article by S. Sevast’ianova on the symbolism of episcopal attire in the eyes of Patriarch Nikon. The Publications section presents a text and a lexical index of the Apocalypsis with Commentaries (sixteenth-century Serbian manuscript) prepared for publication by I. Trifonova; and continues A. Strakhov's publication of Polissian folklore (rusalki). The Speculum section contains reviews of recent books by T. Ilieva on John Exarch's theological terminology (I. Khristova-Shomova) and by C. Soldat on Ivan the Terrible's Testament of 1572 (Ch. Halperin). The Miscellanea section contains notes by A. Strakhov and F. Molina Moreno.

No. 2 of Palaeoslavica XXII also consists of four sections. The Articles section contains a study by T. Ilieva of basic legal concepts in Old Bulgarian; a study by V. Kalugin on the use of the Glagolitic alphabet in various Cyrillic copies of Prophets with Commentaries; an article by O. Tolochko on literary sources of the description of Kiev’s capture by Mongols in East Slavonic chronicles. The Publications section presents a text of a tomb­stone from the sixteenth-seventeenth centuries (A. Avdeev and G. Donskoi) and a collection of idioms recorded from Belo­russian story-teller V.A. Gretskaia (publ. and comm. by G. Lopatin). The Speculum section contains O. Strakhova’s article on the origin of the Old Slavonic concepts mošči and pričęščenije. The Miscellanea section contains notes by A. Strakhov and A. Maiorov.

Volume XXIII of Palaeoslavica for 2015 consists of two issues (315 pp., 316 pp.). No. 1 of Palaeoslavica XXIII consists of four sections. The Articles section contains a study by E. Syrtsova on the mention of people of Ros (Ῥῶς) in 11th-century Mount Athos manuscripts; a study by H. Rothe on the verbs viděti/věděti (‘to see’ and ‘to know’) in 11th-century Slavonic hymnography; an article by V. Kononovich on the Great Duchy of Lithuania according to Sigismund von Herberstein's description; an article by A.G. Avdeev on the role of inscriptions in Russian heroic epic songs. An article by E.A. Samodelova relates the custom of transgender disguise in Russian folk marriage, and an article by I.A. Kachinskaia discusses terms of kinship and their use to describe the world in dialects of the Russian North. The Publications section presents I. Trifonova's study on the Narratio Aphroditiani in its third Slavonic translation as well as a list of obscene phraseological units in the discourse of the Belorussian storyteller (publ. by G.I. Lopatin). The Speculum section presents a study by O.B. Strakhov on the corpus of earliest translations by Cyril and Methodius, Apostles of the Slavs. The Miscellanea section contains notes by L.Citko, M.A. Lobanov, etc.

No. 2 of Palaeoslavica XXIII also consists of four sections. The Articles section contains a study by I. Khristova-Shomova on the Draganov Menaion of the 13th century. A study by S.V. Tsyb and V.A. Chichinov suggests a new dating for a Mongolian campaign in South Rus. An article by S.K. Sevast'ianova and G.M. Zelenskaia discusses Patriarch Nikon (1605-1681) and his deliberate imitation of the life and feats of St. Metropolitan Filipp of Rus (1507-1569). The article contains 66 illustrations, some of them hitherto unpublished. An article by A.G. Avdeev analyzes Russian social value systems from the end of the 17th to the beginning of the 18th centuries on the basis of inscriptions on headstones. An article by Fr. Molina-Moreno compares Polissian (Ukraine and Belarus) rusalki (mermaids) with ancient sirens. The Publications section contains articles on folk demo­nology in Ukraine and Belarus (A.B. Strakhov) and the Russian North (T.S. Kaneva and D.I. Shomysov). The Speculum section suggests a new hypothesis on the origin of Old Russian Perfect participles ending in -le (by A.B. Strakhov). The Miscellanea sections contains notes on Russian hapax legomena by A.G. Grishchenko and A.B. Strakhov.

Volume XXIV of Palaeoslavica for 2016 consists of two issues (284 pp., 303 pp.). No. 1 of Palaeoslavica XXIV consists of four sections. The Articles section contains a study by V. Kalugin on the use of the Glagolitic alphabet as a decorative element of rubrics in late (end of the 15th-17th centuries) copies of Prophets with Commentaries (the so-called Special Redaction); a study by A. Strakhov on the image of Mother-Earth in medieval South and East Slavic literature and folklore; an article by I. Lemeshkin on the Prague fire of 1541 and its connection to the life of Franciscus Scorina (Francysk Skaryna or Francisk Skorina, ca. 1490—before 29 January 1552), a Belarusian humanist, physician, translator and one of the first book printers in Eastern Europe. The Publications section presents 414 Belorussian magic spells in modern records by G. Lopatin and stories about «scary places» and meetings with their inhabitants in the woods surrounding the basin of the Pechora River (west side of the Ural Mountains) collected by T. Kaneva and others. The Speculum section presents studies by E. Bourbuhakis and M. Mavrodi on Professor Ihor Sevcenko's (1922-2009) legacy and his impact on Byzantine and medieval Slavic history. The Miscellanea section presents a note by G.Parpulov that sheds light on a previously obscure period in the history of two Athonite monasteries and their relations to the famous Maximos the Greek.

No. 2 of Palaeoslavica XXIV presents a reconstruction and publication of a 12th-century manuscript of the Menaion for May (RNB, Sof. 203) that had been partially eaten by mice. The study contains a preface (pp. 1-23), a publication of the manuscript (pp. 24-288), graphical and orthographic commentary to the text (pp. 289-297), and five facsimiles presenting five scribes working with the manuscript (pp. 298-302). The reconstruction of the text (especially of its damaged pieces) was done on the basis of Greek and early Slavonic parallel witnesses (manuscript and printed). The study of the manuscript and its Greek and Slavonic parallels shows that the main scribe of the Menaion did not have access to any other copy of the Menaion. Some of the Canons for Saints that he copied did not have parallels in the early Slavonic Menaion for May and/or were of a different translation not extant in other manuscripts. The orthography of the Menaion contains typical East Slavonic features with no specific regional ones. The text further contains some rare and hitherto unattested lexemes.